Building a Shed Part VII

My wife and I bought two old ten pane French windows a couple of years ago at a flea market. We knew as soon as we saw them that they would be perfect for the front of the shed.  Even though they were in good shape, I had to trim off the edges a little bit so I could work with them.

 photo 20160627_170253.jpg

After I took all the hardware off,  I covered all the screw holes and areas with damage with two-part wood putty. The stuff did the trick as it was hard as a rock the next day.

 photo 20160627_181449.jpg

These windows were very well made with through tenons. They appeared to be made from old growth white pine.

 photo 20160627_180427.jpg

Because we wanted the windows to actually function, I had to build a window frame for each window. I took a 2 x 8, sliced it on my band saw, and milled the lumber down to 3/8″ thick on my planer. I then started to make the bottom sill with a slight chamfer to allow rain water to run off.

 photo 20160702_135257.jpg

I built a frame to fit inside the window opening and sized the window to work inside the frame. I did a whole bunch of test fitting taking it back and forth from the shed. It took all day to make just one of the frames.

 photo 20160702_141520.jpg

Once the window fit, I attached boards inside the frame so that the window would have a nice place to sit when closed.

 photo 20160702_145800.jpg

I bought 2 1/2″ wide hinges with removable pins and laid out the mortises. I cut the mortises with a chisel and a router plane to make the depth of the mortise the same throughout its length.

 photo 20160702_160117.jpg

I then test fitted the window in the frame before I went out to the shed to attach it.

 photo 20160702_163433.jpg

Being very patient, I fitted the window frame to the opening with wood shims and tested the window. It took nearly two hours to fit this window so that it would operate to my liking.

 photo 20160703_195057.jpg

Once the window fit well on the outside, I attached the frame to the opening with 15 gauge galvanized finish nails.

 photo 20160703_195103.jpg

The next day, I built and installed the other window. They both came out really well and open and close with ease.

 photo 20160705_191130.jpg

A simple scrap of cedar with a screw in the center acts as a latch for each window.

 photo 20160709_113911.jpg

Advertisements

4 Replies to “Building a Shed Part VII”

  1. Nice work and good recycling.
    About the sill. If you want the water to drip at the edge of the sill, there should be a lip under the edge of the sill. Otherwise, water tend to follow the underside of the sill back toward the siding, which more or less negates the usefulness of the sill.
    One way to do it would have been to plow a groove near the edges of the sill. Not easy to do when already installed. You still might glue a tiny strip of wood under the edges.
    Sylvain

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s